The
Hildemar
Project

 

Contact Information

Please feel free to contact us at any time regarding issues pertaining to the text or website. The organizers of the Hildemar Project include:

Albrecht Diem

Associate Professor of History, Syracuse University
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Websites:
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Albrecht Diem specializes in the history of late antique and early medieval monasticism. He has published on monastic rules, Columbanian monasticism, hagiography, gender and sexuality, and currently works on a number of editions of Latin monastic texts and a study on the construction of the past in early medieval monastic texts. He co-ordinates the Network for the Study of Late Antique and Early Medieval Monasticism, publishes an online bibliography on monastic studies, and works on the Monastic Manuscript Project which documents the manuscript transmission of early medieval monastic texts.

His tasks within the Hildemar Project include the revision of the Latin text, the preparation of an Index Fontium, html-coding, preparation of links to digitized manuscripts and co-ordinating the collaboration with the translators.

He translated or co-translated the chapters 1, 49, 58, 66, 67 and 69.

Julian Hendrix

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Website: https://carthage.academia.edu/JulianHendrix

Julian Hendrix is a historian of early medieval Europe, with a particular emphasis on the Carolingian empire. His current research projects include the culture of commemoration in Carolingian monasticism and Hildemar of Corbie's Commentary on the Rule of Benedict. From 2009-2012, he oversaw the creation of the Reichenau-St Gall Virtual Library, which created a digital representation of the Carolingian collections of these two monasteries.

For the Hildemar Project, he has contributed translations of chapters 8-10, as well as serving as project manager.

Corinna Prior

PhD student, University of Toronto
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Website: http://utoronto.academia.edu/CorinnaPrior

Corinna Prior is a University of Toronto graduate student specializing in the production and impact of capitulary texts within Carolingian monasteries. She is interested in the construction of authority, the distinctions between sacred and secular space, as well as the place of the world within the cloister.

Her role within the Hildemar project is to develop and maintain the website, to implement new tools and pages for better usability, as well as to assist with editing the complete text. She translated chapters 2 (together with Mariël Urbanus and Bruce Venarde), 50, 51, and 52.

Mariël Urbanus

Alumna History – Utrecht University
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Website: https://uu.academia.edu/MarielUrbanus

Mariël Urbanus studied Medieval Studies at Utrecht University and specializes in early medieval monasticism, the Carolingian Era and medieval Latin. She wrote her thesis on hierarchy in the Hildemar Commentary during her stay at the Institut für Mittelalterforschung in Vienna.

For the Hildemar Project she translated chapters 2 (together with Corinna Prior and Bruce Venarde), 53 and 63. Furthermore she assists getting the translations online and keeping the website updated.

Bruce L. Venarde

Professor of History, Classics, and History of Art & Architecture, Department of History, University of Pittsburgh
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Website: http://www.history.pitt.edu/faculty/venarde.php

Bruce Venarde studies medieval monasticism, gender, and Latin philology and literature. He is the author of Women’s Monasticism and Medieval Society: Nunneries in France and England, 890-1215; Robert of Arbrissel: A Medieval Religious Life; and the Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library edition and translation of the Rule of St. Benedict.

For the Hildemar Project, he does whatever the other editors tell him to do, which includes review and revision of both the Latin text and many of the accompanying translations of Hildemar’s Commentary. He translated or co-translated the prologue and chapters 2, 7.12, 30, 36, 46, 49, and 65.


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